Victor Pickard

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[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] The media system in the United States could have developed into something very different than what it is today. In fact, there was an era in which significant media reform was considered. This was a time when media consumers were tired of constant advertising, bias, and control by corporate entities, and instead wanted more “public-oriented” content. Sound at all familiar?

In his new book, America’s Battle for Media Democracy: The Triumph of Corporate Libertarianism and the Future of Media Reform (Cambridge University Press, 2014), Victor Pickard, an assistant professor of communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania, examines the debates on media reform and policy from the early 20th century, focusing, in particular, on radio. Pickard revisits the significant media policy conflicts to analyze why the American media is the way it is, and how it could have been. In so doing, he considers what the current American media system means for the Web and other new media.

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Bridget ConorScreenwriting: Creative Labor and Professional Practice

November 18, 2014

Bridget Conor’s new book, Screenwriting: Creative Labor and Professional Practice (Routledge, 2014), looks closely at the creative practice and profession of screenwriting for film and television in the US and UK.  Situated within the critical media production studies paradigm, Screenwriting analyzes the history, current industrial practices, identities, and cultural milieu that surround this form of [...]

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Randal MarlinPropaganda and the Ethics of Persuasion (Second Edition)

November 17, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Journalism] It’s been 100 years since the start of the First World War, a conflict that cost millions of lives. In his recently revised book, Propaganda and the Ethics of Persuasion (2013), Randal Marlin writes that Britain pioneered propaganda techniques to sell that war that have been imitated ever since. He tells how the British [...]

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Alon PeledTraversing Digital Babel: Information, E-Government, and Exchange

November 7, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] Failure by government agencies to share information has had disastrous results globally. From the inability to prevent terrorist attacks, like the 9-11 attacks in New York City, Washington D.C., and Pennsylvania, to the ill-equipped and ill-fated responses to disasters like the nuclear meltdown at Fukushima, and Hurricane Katrina, a common [...]

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Ethan ZuckermanRewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection

November 6, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in World Affairs] In the early days of the Internet, optimists saw the future as highly connected, where voices from across the globe would mingle and learn from one another as never before.  However, as Ethan Zuckerman argues in Rewire: Digital Cosmopolitans in the Age of Connection (Norton, 2013), just because a connection is possible does not [...]

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Marisol SandovalFrom Corporate to Social Media: Critical Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility in Media and Communications Industries

November 5, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Critical Theory] What would a truly ‘social’ social media look like? This is the core question of From Corporate to Social Media: Critical Perspectives on Corporate Social Responsibility in Media and Communication Industries (Routledge, 2014),  the new book by Marisol Sandoval. The text is concerned with the emergence of a seemingly open and democratic space, [...]

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Hugh F. ClineInformation Communication Technology and Social Transformation: A Social and Historical Perspective

October 9, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Technology] There is no doubt that innovations in technology have had, and are having, a significant impact on society, changing the way we live, work, and play. But the changes that we are seeing are far from novel. In fact, most are a continuation of changes to society and societal structure [...]

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Brooke Erin DuffyRemake, Remodel: Women’s Magazines in the Digital Age

September 18, 2014

Brooke Erin Duffy’s Remake, Remodel: Women’s Magazines in the Digital Age (University of Illinois Press, 2013) traces the upheaval in the women’s magazine industry in an era of media convergence and audience media-making. Duffy, assistant professor at Temple University’s School of Media and Communication, is especially interested in the experience of writers, editors, and others [...]

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Ruth FinneganCommunicating: The Multiple Modes of Human Communication

September 14, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Language] The name of the New Books in Language channel might hint at a disciplinary bias towards “language”. So in some sense Ruth Finnegan‘s Communicating: the Multiple Modes of Human Communication (2nd edition; Routledge, 2014) is a departure: central to her approach is the idea that, within a broader view of human communication, language (in the [...]

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Julia AzariDelivering the People’s Message: The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate

September 8, 2014

[Cross-posted from New Books in Political Science] Julia Azari has written Delivering the People’s Message: The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate (Cornell University Press, 2014). Azari is assistant professor of political science at Marquette University. What was President Obama’s mandate when he was elected in 2008? Did that mandate extend to 2012? We commonly think that mandates attach to [...]

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